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How to talk to your daughter about her body, step one: don’t talk to your daughter about her body, except to teach her how it works.

Don’t say anything if she’s lost weight. Don’t say anything if she’s gained weight.

If you think your daughter’s body looks amazing, don’t say that. Here are some things you can say instead:

“You look so healthy!” is a great one.

Or how about, “You’re looking so strong.”

“I can see how happy you are – you’re glowing.”

Better yet, compliment her on something that has nothing to do with her body.

Don’t comment on other women’s bodies either. Nope. Not a single comment, not a nice one or a mean one.

Teach her about kindness towards others, but also kindness towards yourself.

Don’t you dare talk about how much you hate your body in front of your daughter, or talk about your new diet. In fact, don’t go on a diet in front of your daughter. Buy healthy food. Cook healthy meals. But don’t say “I’m not eating carbs right now.” Your daughter should never think that carbs are evil, because shame over what you eat only leads to shame about yourself.

Encourage your daughter to run because it makes her feel less stressed. Encourage your daughter to climb mountains because there is nowhere better to explore your spirituality than the peak of the universe. Encourage your daughter to surf, or rock climb, or mountain bike because it scares her and that’s a good thing sometimes.

Help your daughter love soccer or rowing or hockey because sports make her a better leader and a more confident woman. Explain that no matter how old you get, you’ll never stop needing good teamwork. Never make her play a sport she isn’t absolutely in love with.

Prove to your daughter that women don’t need men to move their furniture.

Teach your daughter how to cook kale.

Teach your daughter how to bake chocolate cake made with six sticks of butter.

Pass on your own mom’s recipe for Christmas morning coffee cake. Pass on your love of being outside.

Maybe you and your daughter both have thick thighs or wide ribcages. It’s easy to hate these non-size zero body parts. Don’t. Tell your daughter that with her legs she can run a marathon if she wants to, and her ribcage is nothing but a carrying case for strong lungs. She can scream and she can sing and she can lift up the world, if she wants.

Remind your daughter that the best thing she can do with her body is to use it to mobilize her beautiful soul.

 Wordpress (via exoticwild)

Doing all of these for my future daughter because my mom never did 1 of these for me.

(via soulfulginger)

That fucking comment is all too real

(via smoakahontas)

(Source: moxie-bird)

Can I just say they’re just too perfect!!
Just discovered Anni and Jasmin’s storyline a week ago and I can’t get enough of them! 
(taken from Linda Marlen’s fb)

Can I just say they’re just too perfect!!
Just discovered Anni and Jasmin’s storyline a week ago and I can’t get enough of them!
(taken from Linda Marlen’s fb)

We teach girls to shrink themselves, to make themselves smaller. We say to girls, “You can have ambition But not too much. You should aim to be successful but not too successful otherwise you will threaten the man.” Because I am female I am expected to aspire to marriage. I am expected to make my life choices always keeping in mind that marriage is the most important. Now marriage can be a source of Joy and love and mutual support, but why do we teach girls to aspire to marriage and we don’t teach boys the same? We raise girls to see each other as competitors- not for jobs or for accomplishments which I think can be a good thing- but for the attention of men. We teach girls that they cannot be sexual beings In the way that boys are. Feminist: a person who believes in the social political, and economic equality of the sexes.

(Source: taylorswifs)

avatardedpotterhead:

knowledgetrollop:

this is literally the most beautiful love story my god

i aspire to have this marriage

(Source: sandandglass)

thepagejakeenglish:

CANT RISK IT

Welcome to Team Ruhse!

teamruhse:

For all things Anni (Linda Marlen Runge) and Jasmin (Janina Uhse) from the German TV soap GZSZ (Gute Zeiten Schlechte Zeiten).

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  • 16 year old child: mom, dad: I'm gay/lesbian/bi/pan
  • Straight parents: you're too young to know what your sexuality is! It's just a phase.
  • Baby boy: *stares at a baby girl for no reason other than the fact that babies stare at everything*
  • Straight parents: oooh! Ladies man! We're gonna have to keep the girls offa you!
“Men still have trouble recognizing that a woman can be complex, can have ambition, good looks, sexuality, erudition, and common sense. A woman can have all those facets, and yet men, in literature and in drama, seem to need to simplify women, to polarize us as either the whore or the angel.”

(Source: ggrint)

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